A Bringer of New Things

I want to read and learn all I can, write thoughtfully and truthfully, live according to reason and ever more mature wisdom, and savor every wonderful little gift of life.

The Cambridge Platonists: An Important but Forgotten Group of Thinkers

Here’s an interesting historical tidbit from some studies I did a while back (specifically, from a paper I wrote for a graduate course I took a few years ago). I was intrigued to learn about a group of thinkers I had never heard of, but who made an important contribution to Western thought.

Ralph Cudworth. Photo from Wikipedia (credit: Magnus Manske)

Ralph Cudworth. Photo from Wikipedia (credit: Magnus Manske)

The Cambridge Platonists were a set of scholars at Cambridge University who published works from the 1630s to the 1680s. Their works shared certain emphases, such as esteem for the philosophy of Plato (hence, their name). The two best-known Cambridge Platonists were Ralph Cudworth (1617-1689) and Henry More (1614-1687).Their importance is that they helped to define the philosophy of religion as a discipline. They even coined the term philosophy of religion.

Today, philosophy of religion is a subject within philosophy; it seeks to explore religious questions through objective, rational means—as opposed to theology, which explores religious questions from the starting point of assuming certain religious doctrines to be true.

Before the seventeenth century, philosophy and religion were mostly intertwined. The writings of the Cambridge Platonists helped separate the two concepts. Though we have largely forgotten them today, we are indebted to them for helping create an important distinction in Western thought, one that opened the way for further breakthroughs in scholarly thinking about philosophy and religion.

 In short: in the 1600s, the Cambridge Platonists laid a stepping stone for Western civilization’s jog toward the Enlightenment.

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One comment on “The Cambridge Platonists: An Important but Forgotten Group of Thinkers

  1. kdankovich
    September 17, 2013

    Thanks for the information, Sarrah. I am going to share that at our Philosophy Club meeting on the 23rd. I’m sure Carol C. knows this – and no doubt others do, too – but I didn’t.

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This entry was posted on September 16, 2013 by in Discoveries from Learning and tagged , , , , , , , , .
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