A Bringer of New Things

Musings on personal growth, books, motherhood, writing, and more. "Every hour is saved from that eternal silence, something more, a bringer of new things." – Tennyson

Overheard

photo-42121Last weekend while I was shopping in a local discount department store, I overheard this bit of conversation between a mother and young daughter behind me:

“The problem is, you keep picking out things that are too expensive.”

“Mom, I am expensive!”

I just loved that. I applaud that girl for naming the reality that she is expensive, both by definition as a dependent and by the recognition that her tastes aren’t cheap.

I hope she will hang on to that buoyant sense of self-worth, in the face of the people and circumstances who will try to shove her down, as she journeys to adulthood.

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4 comments on “Overheard

  1. emilievardaman
    August 28, 2014

    I like it, too, but I hope the mom took the opportunity to talk about choices. Clearly, most families have budgets. The girl needs to learn how to prioritize. And expensive “this” means she won’t get something else – or two something elses.
    When I was in high school, a friend of mine received a clothing budget at the beginning of each semester. Her dad gave her the cash. That was all he would give her for the entire semester for clothing. She got a little extra weekly allowance, I think, but she had to decide what her wardrobe needed and what she could buy with what she was given.
    It seems most kids have no knowledge of budgeting. I had little until I went off to college. But also, back then, there were many fewer “goodies” for kids to want. No technology, party-line telephones, etc. Not so much to want.

    Like

    • Sarrah J. Woods
      August 28, 2014

      I totally agree, Emilie. The mother’s line (“You’re picking out things that are too expensive!”) seemed very harsh because she wasn’t including her daughter in the decision-making process. Way to point that out! I definitely agree that parents should help their children learn the essential life skill of budgeting and making choices about what to/not to buy.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Emily J.
    August 28, 2014

    As a person who has always had expensive taste, I sympathize with her, but yeah, real life has to be part of her decisions as well. This made me laugh! Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sarrah J. Woods
      August 28, 2014

      Very true! As I just replied to Emilie’s comment, the mother’s attitude here is a bit tyrannical, just telling the daughter what she can and cannot buy without including her in the decision process, through, say, a budget or a set limit. Unfortunately, this is typical of the kind of parenting I observe frequently around here. I’m hoping this girl’s confidence will lead her to be a better parent one day than her mother!

      Like

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This entry was posted on August 28, 2014 by in Discoveries from Living and tagged , , , , , , , , , .
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